How We Are Addressing Coronavirus (COVID-19) In Our Office

Reasons Why Sleep Is Vital to a Teen’s Mental Health

Now that school is back in session, teenagers face new stress of balancing homework, extracurricular activities, family situations, and social events. It’s a lot for a developing brain to manage, and many teens need extra mental health support. The pressures of ongoing responsibilities and a jam-packed schedule can make it hard for people of all ages to cope with stress. Often, the most effective mental health solutions start with self-care and small, daily habits. In order to have the resilience and wellness needed to get through the day, teenagers must begin with a good night’s sleep. Teenagers and Sleeping Habits The problem is that many teens are developing poor sleep habits. They stay up too late, often spending hours on social media, playing video games, or texting with their friends. These activities stimulate the eyes and brain, making it hard to fall asleep at a reasonable hour. Exhaustion sets in the next day, making it hard to get through daily responsibilities due to lack of sleep. So, a teenager often feels the need to take a nap after school, which disrupts the sleep cycle even more. This vicious pattern takes an undeniable toll on mental health and overall wellness. Why…

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September Is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Did you know that suicide is the second most common cause of death in teenagers between the ages of 13 and 19? September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, and this topic is more important than ever. The mental health strain from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on people of all ages. The National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month started through The Jason Foundation. Clark Flatt wanted to honor memories of his son, so he founded the movement to bring awareness about the topic of suicide in our communities. This organization offers resources and training to help people of all ages learn the signs of suicide. A Silent Epidemic Suicide is a “silent epidemic” sweeping across the nation. As a result, mental health experts designated this month as a National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month as a way to share information with family, friends, advocates, teachers, and the community. The goal is to reduce the risk of suicide by identifying the early signs of mental health issues. Not only are teenagers at risk for suicide, but adults are also facing mental health challenges that lead to suicide attempts at times. By educating the public about the risks and signs, we…

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The Stages of Bereavement and How Therapy Can Help

It may not occur to you that you can get help during bereavement. Yet, if you have lost a loved one, the feelings of grief can overwhelm your life. So, what are the stages of bereavement? What can you expect from bereavement therapy? And how can you recognize when you need to seek counseling? Read on to find out. The Stages of Bereavement You may think that someone close to you has to die in order to experience real grief. But you can experience bereavement during any significant life change: divorce, relationship end, job loss, illness diagnosis, moving, retirement, or sending a child off to college. Here are the stages of grief: Denial: The first stage of grief includes feeling like your loss didn’t happen. You pretend that everything is okay and compartmentalize the loss as if someone is just on vacation or away on business. Anger: Sometimes, when you experience the anger stage of bereavement, you direct your big emotions toward something unrelated to the loss. This could be a neighbor who is blaring their music or a child who is acting up. Bargaining: You go through scenarios where if one thing went differently, you would still have your…

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Understanding Mindfulness

Mindfulness Can Help Improve Your Mental Health Millions of people live with anxiety, depression, and a host of other mental health conditions that affect their day-to-day lives. People are always looking for a way to manage their mental health effectively. One such practice many people find helpful is mindfulness. But what really is mindfulness? This concept has been around for thousands of years but only gained popularity in western cultures in the 1970s. It draws from ancient Hindu and Buddhist philosophy and traditions. Many psychologists are enamored with it, making it one of the most widely researched areas in modern psychology. It has proven time and time again to be an effective way to help those manage their mental health. Even the team at Lifeworks Counseling Center recognizes the many mental health benefits mindfulness presents. Lifeworks Counseling Center understands the importance of prioritizing your mental health. As last year has shown us, life can throw many things at us that impact our mental health negatively. Practices such as mindfulness can help you manage your mental well-being. If you are looking for counseling or would like to learn more about mindfulness, contact Lifeworks today. History of Mindfulness Mindfulness is deeply rooted…

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How to Prioritize Your Mental Health in 2021

Start the New Year by Prioritizing Your Mental Health 2020 has been a challenging year for almost everyone. The emotional and mental well-being of countless people took significant hits throughout this year. From the global pandemic to civil unrest, 2020 was full of moments that were draining for so many people. In times of self-isolation, it can be hard to prioritize and care for your own mental health. As 2020 comes to a close, many of the same issues and obstacles you currently face will not magically go away. However, the beginning of a new year is synonymous with change and rebirth. Many people take this time as an opportunity to make significant lifestyle changes to put their health first. That also includes your mental health. Even if you don’t make New Year’s resolutions, it’s often difficult not to examine your life as a new year begins. As we approach 2021, it is time to prioritize your mental health and put your overall well-being first. Lifeworks Counseling Center encourages everyone to care for their mental health, regardless of the time of year. For many, the start of a new year is the perfect time to do so. However, if you…

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How the Holidays Impact Your Mental Health

The Holidays Can Weigh on Your Mental Health As the year comes to an end, the holiday season is officially here! It is one of the busiest and most popular times of the year. From Thanksgiving to Christmas, the holidays are a time to get together with friends and family to celebrate everything you’re most thankful for in life. However, the busyness and stress of the holidays impact your mental health in ways you might not have thought about before. The holidays involve gatherings with friends and family, gift-giving, cooking and baking, traveling long distances, and so much more. While this time is enjoyable for many, all of the stress from the holidays can make mental health struggles like depression and anxiety much worse. The Holiday Blues are a real issue that affects countless people from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day. A host of factors play into how holidays impact your mental health over this period. When you understand how the holidays affect you, you can take the right steps to prioritize your mental health during the holidays. While the holidays are a time for love, joy, and thankfulness, they can be quite stressful for many people. Rates of depression,…

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International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day (November 21)

Suicide Impacts All of Those Who Love That Person Suicide has been an issue that has plagued our society for centuries. While some cultures have condoned suicide in certain situations (for example, ancient Greece gave people convicted of crimes a chance to take their lives), most societies have condemned the act. Many countries even established criminal law to decrease the rate of suicide, but the effects were minimal. Suicide does not just impact the individual committing the act. It affects all of those around the person, from friends and family members to even coworkers. Often, these people are left with inconsolable grief. The trauma and loss they experience can be hard to overcome. These deaths are unlike any other. They are self-inflicted, a choice made by the individual. Pair this with the stigma of suicide and mental illness, and it can be hard to come to terms with what happened. Those who have survived this act need all of the support they can get, which is why International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day was established in 1999. International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day (also known as Survivor Day) occurs every year on the Saturday before Thanksgiving because the holidays are…

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Can Owning a Pet Boost Your Mental Health?

Playing With a Pet Can Boost Your Mental Health Who doesn’t love coming home to cuddle and play with a dog or cat? Owning a pet is like having a soft and happy best friend at all hours of the day. You’ll be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn’t love spending some quality time with their furry friend. However, are you aware that owning a pet can boost your overall mental health? While it might seem obvious, owning a pet has proven to be an effective way to help those living with mental illness. Many people often see pets as just another member of the family, but they can help improve your mental health by just being in your vicinity. For example, many veterans receive emotional support animals (ESA) to help them with mental health disorders they develop after their time in service (such as PTSD). Even children’s hospitals bring in emotional support animals to help boost the morale of young patients. Most pet owners recognize the almost immediate joy they get from hanging out with their furry friends. However, many pet owners are unaware of the physical and mental health benefits our pets bring us. There is a strong…

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Misconceptions About Mental Illness

These Misconceptions Make It Hard to End the Stigma In recent years, there has been a concerted effort around the world to end the stigma surrounding mental illness. Most recently, Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott opened up about his own struggles with his mental health. He discussed how the pandemic, paired with his brother’s death, impacted him. As more individuals come forward, we are slowly moving towards a world that is not afraid to speak up about mental illness. However, as that conversation becomes more and more open, there are plenty of things people don’t understand about mental illness and mental health. Fortunately, not everyone has personal experience with mental illness. These individuals cannot always grasp the gravity of the situation if they have not experienced mental illness themselves or had someone close to them go through it. That does not mean that they cannot be supportive or helpful. However, it does often lead to the spread of misconceptions. These misconceptions about mental illness can be detrimental to destigmatizing the discussion. They give people the wrong idea. It is crucial to identify these misconceptions and clear the air. Doing so will allow the conversation to progress smoothly. If you or…

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What to Know About Suicide

Millions of Americans Struggle with Suicidal Thoughts In recent years, a push for mental health awareness has gained more and more support. More people are beginning to accept and understand the seriousness of mental illness. For years, people felt like because they couldn’t see someone’s affliction that it did not exist. To further increase awareness, September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. This month is a time to share resources and stories about one’s experience with mental illness and suicide, whether from losing a loved one or experiencing suicidal tendencies. National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month aims to shed light on the topic of suicide with the hopes of destigmatizing the discussion around it. Every day, people continue to struggle with their mental health. Whether because no one believes them, they are ashamed of their affliction, or they do not have access to the proper resources, far too many people feel like suicide is their only option. However, with an increased push for suicide awareness like National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, we hope to see more people feel comfortable discussing this stigmatized topic. Hopefully, in the future, we can see a drastic decrease in the number of suicides. If you or…

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